tags

Azure

Using TypeScript to write Cosmos DB stored procedures with async/await

Disclaimer: I am by no mean a TypeScript expert. In fact, I know very little about JS, npm, gulp, etc. So it's entirely possible I said something really stupid in this article, or maybe I missed a much simpler way of doing things. Don't hesitate to let me know in the comments! Azure Cosmos DB (formerly known as Azure Document DB) is a NoSQL, multi-model, globally-distributed database hosted in Azure. If you come from relational SQL databases, it's a very different world.

Scaling out ASP.NET Core SignalR using Azure Service Bus

ASP.NET Core SignalR is a super easy way to establish two-way communication between an ASP.NET Core app and its clients, using WebSockets, Server-Sent Events, or long polling, depending on the client's capabilities. For instance, it can be used to send a notification to all connected clients. However, if you scale out your application to multiple server instances, it no longer works out of the box: only the clients connected to the instance that sent the notification will receive it.

Multitenant Azure AD issuer validation in ASP.NET Core

If you use Azure AD authentication and want to allow users from any tenant to connect to your ASP.NET Core application, you need to configure the Azure AD app as multi-tenant, and use a “wildcard” tenant id such as organizations or common in the authority URL: openIdConnectOptions.Authority = "https://login.microsoftonline.com/organizations/v2.0"; The problem when you do that is that with the default configuration, the token validation will fail because the issuer in the token won't match the issuer specified in the OpenID metadata.

Writing a GitHub Webhook as an Azure Function

I recently experimented with Azure Functions and GitHub apps, and I wanted to share what I learned. A bit of background As you may already know, I'm one of the maintainers of the FakeItEasy mocking library. As is common in open-source projects, we use a workflow based on feature branches and pull requests. When a change is requested in a PR during code review, we usually make the change as a fixup commit, because it makes it easier to review, and because we like to keep a clean history.